Butterick 4752

$6.00


Butterick 4752

B4752-6
Chest: 25-27" Waist: 22-23½" Hip: 26-28"
6-7-8
Uncut.

This girls' dress and petticoat will make her feel  extra special. The dress has a semi-fitted bodice, tie ends that tie in back, flared skirt, back zipper, and long set-in sleeves with gathered sleeve caps. It has a round neckline with a sweet rounded Peter pan collar. The petticoat is a half slip that has an elastic waist, yokes, and ruffles. Butterick Classical Kids, 1996.

* * * My Mind Wanders * * * 
I like a slip under a skirt or dress. Slips are usually made from some type of nylon to make sure the slip is soft on your skin, unlike the dress or skirt. A slip also helps hide shadows when in the sunlight. I'm not sure a lot of ladies know how much they're revealing when they stand in the sun in a skirt. 

In recent years, not only are ladies not wearing a slip, they don't even own one. If you've gone slip shopping recently, you likely found it difficult to find slips in stores. I am partial to full slips, as half slips add another layer around the waist. Those are really hard to find. 

Slips aren't hard to make, and you can add lace or trims if you'd like to make it a little more elegant. One tip is to use the correct type of sewing machine needles. Most machine manufacturers recommend using a ballpoint needle on nylon.

If you've sewn a long time, you'll probably re-learn a few things you forgot if you re-read your sewing machine's manual. I had that experience recently, and I'd forgotten my old reliable machine could do so much. I bought my favorite machine new in 1978 and have used it ever since. That machine is a Bernina Electronic Record 830, the work horse of all work horses of home sewing machines. I also own a newer model Singer that makes fancier stitches and two White sergers, also work horses. I've sewn a gazillion hours on those machines, and I still use them. I might add other machines to my collection, but I won't get rid of the Bernina or my first White serger. They run like tops, are reliable, and I service them myself. It isn't that hard. You should try it. I got sticker shocked when I saw a sewing machine service's price list. $120 to clean and check a non-computer machine. Holy cow - I didn't know how much money I've saved over the years!

I learned to sew on my mom's old Universal sewing machine. My parents bought me my own sewing machine for high school graduation. It was also a Universal, and I wore it out between 1967 when I got in and 1978 when I bought the Bernina. I have enjoyed many satisfying hours sewing for myself, my home, and my family. I hope you enjoy sewing as much as I do.

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